Heartbeet Kitchen
One-Pot Braised Beef Roast with Carrot Mash & Olives {AIP, Paleo}
March 16, 2015 in AIP (Autoimmune Protocol) · Dairy-Free · Fall · Gluten-Free · Main Dish · Nut-Free · Paleo · 47 Comments
 Slow Cooker Beef Roast with Creamy Carrot Mash - easy one pot meal: Paleo, AIP, gluten-free
 Slow Cooker Beef with Carrot Mash & Olives - one pot meal {AIP, paleo}

Slow Cooker Beef Roast with Olives & Carrot Mash ~ AIP, Paleo - delicious one pot mealIf you asked me what meal I hated most as a child, that even ended up with me getting a little swat to the behind, it was my mom’s slow cooker braised beef roast and carrots. Both of my parents worked hard, had full-time jobs and coached youth sports before I started to play. I’d tag along with one of them to practice, or hold down the home front with the other. When my mom wasn’t able to be there for dinner, she always made sure my dad and I were well fed.

She’d make it easy for us, whether that be portioned out leftovers or something in the crockpot like wild rice soup or a beef roast similar to this. Even though it was a great meal, there was something about the smell, as well as the mushy texture of the carrots that I turned my nose up at.

Slow Cooker Beef Roast with Carrot Mash | easy one pot meal (paleo, AIP, gluten-free)One day I decided to try and pull a fast one on my dad instead of hating every bite. As he was finishing up a phone call, I quickly headed to the bathroom and dumped the carrots and most of the beef into the wastebasket. Clearly at 5 years old I didn’t quite understand that the smell wasn’t going to be absorbed by the tissues I threw on top of it.

Slow Cooker Beef with Carrot Mash, Thyme & Olives Unfortunately for me he went to the bathroom after getting off the phone, and my heart sank. I heard him mumble “What is that smell?”….. I knew I was in trouble. A quick swat to my behind and no bedtime snack was the price I paid.

Easy Slow-Cooker Beef Roast ~ one pot meal, with carrot mashAnd then there I was last week, taking my first bite of this slow-braised beef with carrot mash, feeling like I had just hit the comfort food jackpot. It had cooked for about 6 hours, the meat so tender, practically falling apart as I pulled the chuck roast out (which tends to be a tougher cut if you don’t let it cook super slowly).

Another reason why for the most part, I haven’t felt deprived as I go along this autoimmune protocol journey. Real food is just damn delicious food.

Slow Cooker Beef Roast with Carrot Mash | easy one pot meal (paleo, AIP, gluten-free)Part of the success lies in searing the garlic-rubbed meat to hold all the juices in, which I was able to do all in one-pot because I used my new KitchenAid Multi-Cooker.  The other part is the leeks, thyme and olives that impart so much flavor into the beef and carrots as they roast. Quick tip: woody herbs like rosemary like thyme are great for slow cooker meals because they can withstand the heat, and also have more savory notes than let’s say dill which adds brightness.

Instead of leaving the carrots in the withered segments they had “melted” into, I simply mashed them, no extra fat needed because they soak up that of the beef.

I couldn’t help but make a simple sauce/gravy out of those extra bits of leeks, garlic and juices that had collected at the bottom pan either. All I did was add a little tapioca starch to thicken it.

The Best Carrot Mash | perfect alongside pork, chicken (paleo, dairy-free)This one-pot meal makes great leftovers too, something that I’m coming to rely on so much more with AIP because you can’t just grab some crackers, cheese, nuts & wine.

You know I’ve talked about those single lady dinners before. And although I do miss the convenience of that and some of my favorite things, I relish the way I feel after I nourish myself with all the nutrient-dense food I’m eating.

Simple & Creamy Carrot Mash {paleo, gluten-free}And big thanks to KitchenAid for letting me try out their new Multi-Cooker (image below) – whoa, talk about blown away. It does EVERYTHING. But better yet, its one of the easiest appliances to run that I’ve owned despite all of the bells and whistles. I would compare it to a Mac computer – looks super fancy, yet so intuitive and easy to get started with, no hour long manual reading needed.

It has settings like saute, sear, soup, yogurt, risotto, rice, boil/steam, simmer, slow cook low and high and you can also just set it at a certain temperature to cook at. It even has an arm that you can attach to it to periodically stir your soup, casserole or whatever deliciousness you’re cooking up. Seriously genius. I made rice for Brian in it and it turned out perfect. Now I can get rid of our rice cooker and free up precious kitchen space. And I’m making coconut yogurt later this week!

Slow Cooker Beef with Carrot Mash & Olives ~ AIP, Paleo (easy one-pot meal)So with that, week 3 of my AIP journey has begun. It’s up and down, but I’m determined.

And to my Mom, please know my adult palate thinks quite differently now, and I would gladly come home for beef roast, carrots, and your company.

One-Pot Slow Braised Beef with Carrot Mash & Olives

AIP, paleo, gluten-free
serves 4

1 1/2 to 2 pound grassfed beef chuck roast
3 cloves garlic, divided
2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
1/2 teaspoon dried basil
1 1/4 teaspoons salt, divided
1/2 cup chopped leeks
4 sprigs of fresh thyme
15 olives olives (your choice of what kind)
1 pound carrots, halved lengthwise, then cut into 3 inch pieces
1/4 cup water
1/2 tablespoon arrowroot or tapioca starch (also labeled as tapioca flour)

Bring your meat to room temperature and in a small bowl mix together 2 cloves of minced garlic, 1 tablespoon olive oil, basil and 1 teaspoon salt. Rub all over the beef roast to coat, working it into the meat.

Slow-Cooker Beef Roast with Olives & Carrot Mash | with the KitchenAid Multi-CookerPreheat your Kitchenaid Multi-Cooker to the sear setting. If you are using a regular slow cooker, preheat a cast iron skillet to high. Add 1 tablespoon oil to the bottom of the cooker/pan and sear the meat for 5 minutes on each side, so that there is a browned appearance.

Remove beef, then stir in leeks and remaining one clove garlic, cook for 4 minutes until softened. Then add in carrots, remaining salt, olives, water and thyme. Nestle beef roast into carrots, but not touching the bottom of the cooker. Cook on low for 5-6 hours.

Step by Step instructions: How to Make Slow Cooker Beef Roast & Carrot MashWhen roast is done, remove and set aside. Then take carrots out and mash in a bowl with a fork or potato masher. To the drippings in the pan, add the tapioca starch and stir until thickened. You can add a little water as needed, and adjust salt as needed.

Serve, cutting beef against the grain on top of carrot mash and with olives alongside.

*Disclosure: Kitchenaid provided me with the Multi-Cooker used in this post — and I love it! So many thanks to them.

This post is linked to the Paleo AIP Recipe Roundup.

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47 thoughts on “One-Pot Braised Beef Roast with Carrot Mash & Olives {AIP, Paleo}

  1. [email protected]

    This beef looks so perfectly cooked and those mashed carrots must taste amazing with it!

    Reply
  2. H.J.

    I would have traded this for my disgusting beef liver dinners any time you wanted! We took in a cat and I’d try to feed all my liver to the cat, what a God send while it lasted! LOL!

    Reply
    1. Amanda Paa Post author

      Rebecca, it feels so good too. I don’t miss a lot of things on AIP, it just gets tough when I want a quick snack. But that’s what leftovers are for now!

      Reply
  3. cristina

    Enjoyed your story, Amanda, of what you did at 5 years old with your dish. :)

    This is pure comfort, delicious food and I wouldn’t turn my nose on it. If anything, I would savor the delicious aroma of the beef, especially when its cooking. Luv that multi-cooker! :)

    Reply
    1. Amanda Paa Post author

      Cristina, was fun taking a trip down memory lane that’s for sure. Funny how we grow to love certain foods! I think part of that is we know how to impart flavors more now than we used to. The thyme and leeks really add a lot to this dish.

      Reply
  4. [email protected]

    This is so inviting, beautiful, and delicious. I could eat it all right now.

    Reply
  5. [email protected]

    Beautiful!! A similar meal was one of my favorites growing up too..although I am pretty sure there was some sort of weird powdered mix involved (long before we knew better!)

    Reply
  6. The Blonde Chef

    Ok, you totally nailed the white-on-white shot here! Seriously, the lighting is gorgeous and I love how you captured the slight sheen on the meat! Well done and this sounds delicious!

    Reply
  7. Elaine Paa

    Thanks for a ride down memory lane. That’s why you never were thrilled when I had your family over for a beef roast dinner. Love your story telling of your life. Makes me feel like your hear talking to me. Grandma

    Reply
    1. Amanda Paa Post author

      That’s right :) One of the few meals I didn’t like. Your sauerkraut and dumplings was always my favorite.

      I only wish you were right here with me grandma, love you!

      Reply
  8. Angie | Big Bear's Wife

    Oh my gosh haha, I totally laughed out loud at thinking about you trying to hid the food with the tissues. I could imagine the look on your dad’s face. Ps. Love the beef in this blog post, we’ve got to make this soon!

    Reply
    1. Amanda Paa Post author

      Thalia, thanks for stopping by! As I try to move into springtime flavors, this seems to be a good bridge. The carrots add freshness and color. Have a great weekend!

      Reply
  9. Sarah @ SnixyKitchen

    Ha! At least you hid it in the trash can! I used to put my beef under my chair at dinner…I think the idea of mashing up the overcooked carrots is genius! Overcooked carrots are the worst texture ever, but mashed up? It’s like sweet mashed potatoes. Also – I TOTALLY want one of those multi-cookers now!

    Reply
    1. Amanda Paa Post author

      Okay, putting beef under your chair is hilarious! We would have made a good team :) And I’m glad I’m not the only who can’t stand overcooked carrots. I really do love the multi-cooker. Making yogurt in it is so awesome, and it actually keeps a steady temperature instead of being so sporadic.

      Reply
  10. Kathryn

    Ha, your story about childhood meals sounds very familiar (I also tried the sneaky food dumping trick too and never got away with it!). This looks absolutely delicious though and proves that you can still make delicious + nourishing food, whatever dietary restrictions you have!

    Reply
    1. Amanda Paa Post author

      Kathryn, if I ever have children, I’m guessing they’ll probably try it too :) I’m enjoying creating new food while healing, and appreciate your support! xo

      Reply
  11. Kathy

    While I agree with all said above, I’m curious about the actual cooking of it. I’m really wanting to start this eating.
    When you say don’t let it touch the bottom, are you saying make sure all the carrots or at least enough of the carrots are underneath so the meat doesn’t touch? Why is that? I’m curious not at all being condescending. And no more liquid is added at all?
    Thanks.

    Reply
    1. Amanda Paa Post author

      Hi Kathy! Yes, I mean make sure it’s nestled on top and with carrots surrounding it so that air has a chance to circulate around the meat. The other thing this does is let the natural juices of the meat drip into the carrots, which gives them SO much flavor! The recipe calls for adding 1/4 cup water because as it cooks, more water will be produced from the steam. So if you add more, things might get a little soggy – the sugars won’t caramelize in the carrots and the crispy edges of the meat.

      Hope that helps and you enjoy!

      Reply
  12. Krysta

    this recipe looks delicious! I have a new pressure cooker that I am looking to start using more. Any idea as to how this would work in a pressure cooker?

    Reply
  13. Pingback: Paleo Beef Crock Pot Recipes - My Natural Family

    1. Amanda Paa Post author

      Gosh, thanks Alanna. Not nearly as gorgeous as your photos, but that’s what practice is for! Meat can be so tricky to capture. Countdown is on until my visit to San Fran!

      Reply
  14. Teagan

    Hi, I was wondering if there could be a way to make the carrot mash as a side dish for a separate meal. Could I just use the slow cooker and cook down the carrots, or is there a quicker way? Thank you!

    Reply
    1. Amanda Paa Post author

      Hi Teagan! You could steam the carrots until very soft and tender with fresh thyme, then mash them with 2 tablespoons of olive oil or butter. Hope that helps!

      Reply
  15. Cindi

    Just what I was looking for! Love that it includes olives! I have it in the slow cooker now, but I used a 3.2lb roast and some extra carrots, seasoning, etc. Will it need to cook for longer than the 5-6 hours? Thanks for the recipe!

    Reply
    1. Amanda Paa Post author

      Hi Cindi! I would say 6 1/2 to 7 hours will get you to a tender, juicy pot roast because of the extra meat. You can certainly check it at 6 though, and if it falls apart, you’re ready to enjoy!

      Reply
  16. Cindi

    Thanks, Amanda! :) You were right – I wanted to make sure it was cooked in time for dinner, so I put it on high for 1 hour, then left it on for another 5.5-6 on low. It was terrific!

    Reply

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