Heartbeet Kitchen
Homemade Gluten-Free Pasta
March 23, 2014 in Cooking Techniques · Main Dish · Spring · Vegetables · 63 Comments

homemade gluten free pasta | heartbeet kitchenFor the most part, I haven’t missed many foods since I went gluten free three years ago. Usually I can adapt whatever I’m craving into a gluten free version without much difference, like pizza (using the crust recipe from Artisan Pizza in Five Minutes a Day), casseroles and even donuts. But there’s one thing I’ve been longing for: the silky handmade tagliatelle from Cossettas, made by the hands of elderly Italian women, who roll out the dough each day the same as they’ve done for the past 70 years.

homeamde gluten free pasta | heartbeet kitchen I’m longing no more, all thanks to my friend Robin Asbell and her new cookbook, Gluten-Free Pasta. Since last fall when her and I spoke about the hours upon hours she was perfecting the different dough recipes, I’ve been so excited to try her final version. After a few days “cooking the book”, I can attest that the results of her work are simply brilliant.

When I began rolling out the dough into thin sheets of fresh pasta, I nearly wept with joy. As I put the sheets through the machine once again, perfect strands of tagliatelle fell into my flour dusted hands like magic. How to Make Gluten Free PastaRobin’s base recipe for fresh pasta calls for a combination of tapioca flour, millet flour, sweet rice flour, and arrowroot starch, each having their own purpose in creating a texture that mimics regular pasta in the closest way possible. The addition of finely powdered whey (which you can find at co-ops or health stores) or dried milk powder adds protein, which gives the dough strength in the absence of gluten. A combination of guar guam and xanthum gum give the pasta structure and firmness when boiled.

Dough Balls This may seem like quite a few ingredients to have on hand, but they’re essential in stocking a gluten free pantry so its buying them. You’ll definitely use them in other gluten free recipes if you don’t already. Plus, once you try this glorious pasta you’ll be headed back to the kitchen to make another batch.

Although making fresh pasta, gluten free or not, does take some time, tasting the finished product knowing that it was my hands that did the work provides for an amazingly satisfying experience. I know not everyone feels the same way though, and so did Robin, which is why any of the recipes (over 100!) can be made with store bought gluten free (or regular) pasta. My favorite is Tinkyada, which you can find pretty much everywhere, including Target. Additionally there’s instruction and recipes for creating vegetable noodles with zucchini,  squash, or even collard greens, as well as another creative pasta substitute – “egg crepes” that can be used as cannelloni or sliced into strands. There’s so many recipes I can’t wait to dive into. I’ll be posting a gluten free ravioli next week and here are a few others on my “to make” list:

  • Gnocchi with Roasted Tomato-Olive Sauce (recipe for homemade gnocchi included)
  • Avocado, Fresh Mozzarella, and Peach Pasta Salad
  • Japanese Curry Soba with Cauliflower, Tofu, and Red Onion (recipe for homemade buckwheat soba included)

Homemade Gluten-Free Pasta with Creamy Vodka SauceThis book is absolute joy, one that I can tell is going to be stained with plenty of tomato sauce streaks and a fine dusting of flour with all the use it’s going to get. I have several of Robin’s other books including the New Vegetarian and the Whole Grains Cookbook, both which I cook from regularly and highly recommend. If you’re as lucky as me and live in the Twin Cities you can find Robin teaching classes at Cooks of Crocus Hill, Kitchen in the Market, or co-ops. She also has an upcoming book tour so check here to see if she’s coming to your state. In the meantime, check out the other talented bloggers who are participating in Robin’s book launch potluck!

You can find Robin’s book wherever books are sold and of course, on AmazonOR you could be the lucky winner of this giveaway and have Gluten-Free Pasta shipped right to your door! Enter below using the Rafflecopter widget – winner to be announced on March 31st! a Rafflecopter giveaway

Gluten-Free Pasta from Scratch

Gluten-Free Pasta Dough Recipe

from Gluten Free Pasta by Robin Asbell
Serves 4

Tips from my experience:

  • Don’t be afraid to use a little more water as needed to bring the dough together and make it workable.
  • Roll the dough out into rectangles with a rolling pan first, on a floured surface, then begin to work it into the pasta maker.
  • I found that starting on the 5th setting of the pasta making, then once on each lower setting until I reach 2 made was perfect – thin and lanky yet held its structure when cooked.
  • Because gluten free flours are more absorbent than regular, it only needs about 1 1/2 minutes in boiling water to fully cook. Make sure to rinse with warm water, as this helps remove some of the starches ,which if left on do make the pasta gummy.

3/4 cup/90 g arrowroot starch (can substitute cornstarch, which is what I did because I had it on hand)
1/2 cup/60 g tapioca flour
1/2 cup/80 g sweet rice flour
1/4 cup/49 g millet flour
3 tablespoons whey protein, or 3/4 cup (53 g) non-fat dry milk powder (I used Organic Valley milk powder because whey protein is quite expensive)
1 tablespoon guar gum
1 teaspoon xanthan gum
1/2 teaspoon fine salt
3 large eggs
3-4 tablespoons (44-60 mL) water

Measure out the arrowroot starch, tapioca flour, sweet rice flour, millet flour, whey protein, guar gum, xanthan gum and salt and put in the bowl of a stand mixer or a food processor (which is what I used). In a large measuring cup, stir the eggs with the water and add to the dry ingredients. Mix on low until the dough starts to come together in chunks. Turn off the mixer and press the chunks together a couple of times to form a stiff dough. Turn up the mixer speed and beat for two minutes. In the processor, the machine will start to labor when the dough is getting stiff, so take the dough out and knead it manually.

Divide the dough in 4-ounce portions, wrap the portions you are not using with plastic wrap, and either roll out with a rolling pin on the counter or in the pasta rolling machine. Make lasagna sheets or cut into noodles.

Cook the noodles in salted boiling water for 1 1/2 to 2 minutes, then test. They should be tender but firm, just a little softer than al dente dried pasta. Drain and rinse well with warm water if using warm, or cold if using cold, and serve immediately.

Creamy Vodka Sauce

from Gluten Free Pasta by Robin Asbell
makes 3 1/2 cups (will make more than what is needed for this recipe – reserve leftovers for up to a week or cut recipe in half which is what I did)

2 tablespoons olive oil
1 medium onion, minced
3 garlic cloves, chopped
1 small carrot, chopped
1 cup of vodka
2 (28 ounce) cans of whole tomatoes, drained
1 teaspoon fine salt
1/2 cup creme fraiche (I used greek yogurt)
1/2 cup shredded Romano cheese

In medium stock pot, heat olive oil over medium high heat for a minute. Add onion, garlic, and carrot and saute until onion is soft and golden, about 10 minutes. Add whole tomatoes, crushing them roughly with your hans. Add the vodka and salt and bring to boil, then reduce to a low simmer. Cook uncovered until sauce is almost dry, about 30 minutes.
Puree the mixture in a blender or food processor until smooth.Then add in creme friache and blend again to combine. Toss with hot pasta and the the Romano cheese, plus a little basil for garnish.
Homemade Gluten-Free Pasta | heartbeet kitchen

Share:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • Google +
  • Stumble
  • Email

63 thoughts on “Homemade Gluten-Free Pasta

  1. Ruby

    Ooh my this looks scrumptious. I’m afraid of making my own pasta, just because it seems quite labor-intensive, but you’ve inspired me to give it a go if I can manage to gather all of the ingredients!

    Reply
    1. amandapaa Post author

      Hi Ruby! I know, I was always afraid to make my own pasta too but it really is no more difficult than a pie crust. And it’s soooo worth it! I never thought I’d be able to make gluten free pasta that tasted and had the same texture as wheat pasta but this truly does. Let me know how it goes if you do decide to make it!

      Reply
  2. Pingback: Gluten Free Pasta Blog Potluck and a Cookbook Giveaway! | Stuffed Pepper ™

  3. Morgan

    Ohmyword, this looks yummy! I have an old Atlas pasta machine I look forward to dusting off to make this!!! Great, mouthwatering pics… now I’m hungry. Gave this book to a friend as a hostess gift, need to get a copy for myself!

    Reply
    1. amandapaa Post author

      Hi Morgan! I’m so glad you stopped by – I have followed your blog for quite awhile and have always loved your posts and authentic voice. Plus you’re from Minnesota too ;)! I borrowed this pasta maker from a friend, but I am definitely getting my own now. It really isn’t as difficult as I thought it would be to make fresh pasta. Have a great weekend!

      Reply
    1. amandapaa Post author

      Nice Rachelle! I borrowed this pasta maker but I can’t wait to get my own. I’m going to be needing it with all the gluten free pasta I’m making! I’ll have another post up next week about making ravioli.

      Reply
  4. Noella

    Looks like a great recipe. Any ideas, due to allergies, on what can be substituted for the dairy and the eggs?

    Reply
    1. amandapaa Post author

      Hi Noella! You could substitute whey powder for the dried milk powder, with the amount listed in the recipe, but I don’t think an egg replacement like ground flax or chia seeds would work. Sorry :(

      Reply
        1. amandapaa Post author

          Becca – thanks for clarifying that whey is dairy, my mistake. I think it would be difficult to get the same texture without using the dairy component because it helps with the elasticity and softness of the dough. I have a feeling it would turn out rather stiff and break without it. Sorry :( You may want to contact Robin, the author of the book and ask her. Her twitter handle is @robinasbell – hope that helps!

          Reply
          1. Doris K

            There are non-dairy milk powders available now. They should work in this recipe. One of which comes to mind is Better than Milk Vegan Rice Powder. Hope this helps.

  5. Zoe Julian

    This looks amazing! Thank you for sharing with us and for all of your helpful hints and another wonderful recipe to try this week. Is there any chance that you could share your doughnut recipe with us at some point? I have been trying to find a good one that is gluten free but I can’t seem to find one that doesn’t have a weird aftertaste or texture. It is the one thing I can’t seem to manage. Thanks!

    Reply
    1. amandapaa Post author

      Hello Zoe! Thanks for stopping by and the nice comments. I actually have a brown butter donut recipe in my cookbook, Smitten with Squash that will be published this July and is available for pre-order on Amazon right now! I find the key is baking them at a lower temperature and using Cup4Cup flour, which has the best overall flavor and texture of the gf flour mixes on the market. Have a great day!

      Reply
    1. amandapaa Post author

      Alanna, thanks for stopping by! Even though it takes a little time to make, this gluten free pasta is so worth it…. Not to say that I won’t ever buy boxed again, but I’m kind of in love with the fresh stuff! Hope you have a great weekend.

      Reply
  6. artur cesar

    Dear Amanda, Hi from Brazil!
    Very nice article! I was looking for a nice recipe and it looks like I found it.
    I will test it and let you know the results.
    Thanks.
    Artur

    Reply
    1. amandapaa Post author

      Hi Fiona! I’ve never worked with pea protein before so unfortunately I’m not very knowledgeable about how it works in gluten-free cooking. Do you have experience with it? Sounds interesting!

      Reply
  7. Dovile

    Hi, thank you for the great recipe, I have tried it just now and it did taste like a real pasta. I made spaghetti, tagliatelle and used the same dough to make some ravioli. Unfortunately I did not have any milk powder so had to skip it. It still worked however batter was slightly fragile. Following the recipe my dough was too dry and not sticking together so I had to add some olive oil and quite a bit of water. Maybe it had something to do with climate since it is very hot where I live.

    Reply
    1. Amanda Paa Post author

      Hi Dovile – So glad you tried the pasta recipe and enjoyed it! The milk powder does have binding properties, which is probably why you needed to add more water/olive oil. Good to know that it is still works this way! Have a great week.

      Reply
  8. Ariana

    Question: I’m interested in making this as a gift for a friend who does not eat gluten. I know some pastas (especially egg-based) are not supposed to dry well and should be frozen instead. Do you have any thoughts on drying vs freezing this recipe? Or should it even be attempted? Thanks!

    Reply
    1. Amanda Paa Post author

      Hi Ariana! This gluten free pasta definitely freezes well, but I would avoid drying it. I’ve had a lot of success making it into ravioli, then freezing or making the dough, then freezing and rolling out into noodles when unfrozen. Hope that helps, and what a fun gift!

      Reply
  9. Magic and Mayhem

    Looks lovely! I have a pasta machine that I got at a thrift store years ago that I just love. Best $20 ever spent and the homemade GF dough I make with it is so much tastier than any of the store bought stuff — not to mention cheaper since I cook for our family of 7 and company and make a lot of pasta. :)

    Here’s the recipe I created and it’s very mix-and-match with the flours and starches you can use. http://www.examiner.com/article/how-to-make-easy-gluten-free-pasta-with-your-pasta-machine It is dairy free, though I’ve never tried it without eggs.

    Once I got the hang of it, I could have the first batch made by the time the water boiled so it’s almost as fast as making the packaged stuff at this point.

    I have never had a problem with it falling apart or needing soy or whey powder. If you look at the ingredients for most GF pasta it’s generally just one grain and not even xanthan gum (brown rice pasta ingredients are usually: brown rice, for instance) so for people that can’t have dairy or soy, I would not worry at all. I find GF pasta to be much easier than I was afraid it would be!

    Reply
    1. Amanda Paa Post author

      Meg, crazy! What are the chances of that. I love this book so much. It has so many great sauces and flavor combinations beyond the homemade gluten-free pasta. Let me know what you think!

      Reply
    1. Amanda Paa Post author

      i haven’t tried making it dairy free so i can’t attest to that. the milk powder makes it soft and pliable. if you try an adaptation, i’d love to hear how it works out!

      Reply
  10. Pingback: Kimchi Mac and Cheese - Beard + Bonnet

  11. Pingback: 11 Low Carb Pasta Recipes That You'll Never Notice Are Gluten Free

  12. Chessie

    I am vegan and was recently diagnosed with celiac disease, so I definitely feel the pain of the dairy-free people who have commented here. I haven’t tried making pasta yet, but I did buy a bag of xanthan gum (from Bob’s Red Mill, a company that is very careful about cross-contamination) to use in egg- and dairy-free baking. Xanthan gum can do a lot in place of gluten for baked goods. I’ll have to do a bunch of experimenting, but I’m wondering if, between xanthan gum and chickpea flour or soy flour, some kind of vegan, GF noodle might be workable.

    Reply
  13. Henry

    your recipes and help has been a positive inspiration for me and my wife. We started a small Gluten Free Pasta business and we experiment with many gluten free flours and powders in our recipes. Our customers love our many different flavores and awesome taste.
    Yuo can check us out on our FCebook page “J&HPastalicious”. Thank you for the inspiration. …. Henry & Judy

    Reply
    1. Amanda Paa Post author

      Hi Henry & Judy! How lovely to get your message. And thankful that there are people like you taking the chance to build great gluten-free companies whether that be large or small. Good luck on your journey, checking out your page right now! Amanda

      Reply
  14. Elaine

    I would love to try this pasta. I have an extruding pasta machine; do you think this recipe would be workable with that? Thank you.

    Reply
    1. Amanda Paa Post author

      Hi Elaine! I’d love for you to try the pasta too. I’ve never used an extruding pasta machine for this recipe, but I would think it should work. I would just be careful to not get it too thin. Even with the hand machine, it took a little practice.

      Reply
  15. Emily Wells

    Hi! I am wanting to get into making my own gf pasta, but I have never made pasta before. What kind of pasta maker works the best? Also, do pasta makers just flatten out the dough, or do they actually cut the pasta as well?

    Reply
  16. Marlo

    I didn’t have time to read through all the comments but; has anyone made this dough into ravioli?

    Reply
  17. Lindsay

    I’ve tried this plain and it was good, even my 6 1/2 yr old kid loved it lol. today i’m attempting to add some flavors, spinach and carrot. About to go roll it out and see if it worked. Taste test at dinner tonight. :) I also use a gf flour blend i get in bulk at my grocery store instead of all the different flours. Total of 2 cups for a full batch.

    Reply
    1. Amanda Paa Post author

      Oh, so glad you’ve enjoyed the recipe Lindsay – appreciate you letting me know! And those flavor additions sound amazing. they’ll take on such a pretty color too!

      Reply
      1. Lindsay

        They smell good lol. I think I should have used 4 eggs instead of only 3. I did a whole batch but split it in half for each flavor. I also added a smidge of olive oil to each. It tended to go all “flaky” on me when i rolled it. it would stay together for the most part but the top/bottom would flake a bit like a crescent roll. if that makes sense lol.

        Reply
  18. Mike Perry

    This looks and sounds absolutely wonderful. Would you happen to know the nutritional information? I am looking especially for carb count, fiber, fat, sugar, and calories. If you could share this info, I would truly appreciate it. Thanks for your recipes.

    Reply
  19. Laura

    Thank you for posting! I have been looking for a good GFree pasta recipe for all over a year, and haven’t liked any I have tried. None have come close to comparing to my ‘gluten’ fresh pasta, which kills me. I can’t wait to try this!

    Reply
  20. Angela

    Our family has recently gone gluten free due to our daughters intolerance, I tried this recipe because I have been missing fresh pasta; all I can say is WOW! Thank you! Thank you for creating a pasta is on par with any fresh wheat pasta out there, and a dream to work with.

    Reply
    1. amandapaa Post author

      Angela, so glad you enjoyed the fresh pasta! Have you gotten the cookbook? It’s so amazing. Highly recommend it for more recipes like this!

      Reply
  21. Chrissy

    Hi Amanda!
    Do you think this recipe would hold up for a cannelloni? I made some gf cannelloni a few years ago but lost the recipe. It’s my hubby’s favourite dish and I hope to make it this weekend for his bday.
    Thanks!

    Reply
    1. amandapaa Post author

      Yes, i think it would work for cannelloni! i haven’t tried it, but the dough is nice and pliable. i would just make sure not to overcook it.

      Reply
  22. Kelli

    Looking for a GF recipe I made a while back. These ingredients are the same but the recipe I used, the noodles didn’t have to boil. Have you ever made the lasagna without boiling them? Thanks.

    Reply
    1. amandapaa Post author

      Hi Kelli! I’ve never made lasagna noodles with these, or without boiling. I have seen some gf no boil lasagna noodles from Tinkyada though.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *