Heartbeet Kitchen
Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day: Recipe
December 21, 2014 in Appetizer · Breakfast · Dairy-Free · Gluten-Free · 31 Comments

Gluten-Free Bread in 5 Minutes a Day | heartbeet kitchenWhen you learn that gluten is your body’s enemy, the first thing that brings tears is the thought of giving up bread. No more french baguettes or artisan boules – the kind with a textured look and crunch to its exterior, the inside revealing a soft crumb and spring to its “step”. Your single lady dinner of crostini with good cheese, olives and a glass of wine is gone. And the simple egg sandwich that saved you many times from hangry outbursts – well, people better watch out.

I don’t miss many gluten-ful things, and I’m actually thankful for figuring out that years of auto-immune issues were related to gluten. I was forced to explore many “new to me” foods and nourish myself the natural way – with whole grains, vegetables, fruit, lean protein, legumes, nuts, and real dairy.

But dang. Sometimes you just want a piece of really good bread.

Gluten-Free Bread in Five Minutes a Day | recipes from the bookKnowing what brilliance came from Zoë and Jeff’gluten-free pizza dough, I had anxiously been awaiting their Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day book. Living in the same city as this duo and writing a book at the same time, we chatted a little during the process. They put in so many long hours, loaf after loaf tested and retested to bring this brilliant bread technique to those of us who have to avoid gluten.

My first loaf (which is the book’s master dough recipe pictured in the two photos above. The pictures following this paragraph are the Whole Grain Loaf.) was a special experience beyond it being gluten-free. It was my first time making any kind of homemade bread. I had watched my grandmother do it, and my mom made the best homemade buns, but I was nervous about getting the process just right.

Gluten-Free Artisan Bread | made with whole grains, poppy seeds and hemp seedsThat was my Type A personality coming out in full force, which truth be told was why I didn’t do a ton of cooking before this blog was born. Little did I know that being in the kitchen gave me the freedom to embrace creativity and break away from too much self-judgement.

The wonderful thing about Gluten-Free Bread in Five is that it truly simplifies the process. You literally mix the flours & dry yeast, stir in warm water and let the dough do its thing in a warm spot. After that you keep it in the fridge and when you feel like baking a fresh loaf, soft pretzels or a puffy & blistered piece of naan, you get your oven & baking stone smoking hot, no kneading required.

Gluten-Free Artisan Bread | made with whole grains, poppy seeds and hemp seedsAre you pinching yourself hearing these favorites you never thought you’d be able to have again? I’ve made all of those I mentioned above and with each bite I felt like I died and went to heaven.

The taste & texture is far better than any gluten-free bread product at the super market.

Jeff and Zoë provide all the insight to achieve bread baking success the easy way. You’ll learn about things like why it’s important to have an oven thermometer, 3 different ways to produce the steam that gives your loaves that beautiful, crusty top and what different flours do in gluten-free baking (they did the science experimenting for you!).

Whole Grain Gluten-Free Bread from scratchAnd as they discuss in the book, the brand of flour you use does matter. Bob’s Red Mill is their choice when using individual flours to make a gluten-free blend, and mine as well, each one finely ground to produce the lightest loaf and consistency. They have every flour you could ever need and are an amazing resource for all things baking. You can follow along with them on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter as they share great recipes and tips. I’m grateful for their passion in making gluten-free flours accessible and affordable.

And now for the giveaway! St. Martin’s Press will be sending the lucky winner a copy of Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day straight to their door. And also special thanks to Bob’s Red Mill for sponsoring this post. The giveaway is open to US residents only and will end at 11:59pm, January 1st, 2015.

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(Side note: When using pre-mixed blend of gf flour I often use Cup 4 Cup which I’ve written about before, but I just tried Bob’s Red Mill’s new 1-to-1 gluten-free flour blend in these Five-Spice Ginger Thins and I’m quite impressed.)

Whole Grain Gluten-Free Bread with Poppy & Hemp Seeds

(No eggs, 50% Whole Grains)
You’ll find this recipe on page 99 of Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day (which you can buy here) and I added the two seeds for texture and appearance. It is shown as pictures 3-6 in this post.

Gluten-Free-Bread in 5 Minutes | whole grains with poppy and hemp seedsthe dough

3 1/2 cups Gluten-Free All Purpose Blend, referred to as Mixture #1 in book (540 grams)
3 1/2 cups 100% Whole-Grain Gluten-Free Flour, referred to as Mixture #2 in book (540 grams)
1 tablespoon granulated yeast (10 grams)
1 1/4 tablespoons kosher salt (20 grams)
2 tablespoons raw cane sugar (30 grams)
4 3/4 cups lukewarm water, 100 F or below (1,080 grams)
1 tablespoon poppy seeds
1 tablespoon raw hemp seeds
cornmeal or parchment paper for the pizza peel

  • Whisk together the flours, seeds, yeast, salt and sugar in a 5-to-6 quart bowl, or a 5 quart dutch oven, which is what I used.
  • Add the water and mix with a spoon. Cover (not airtight), and allow to rest at room temperature until the dough rises, approximately 2 hours. Don’t be surprised that it doesn’t rise much. This is normal.
  • The dough can be used immediately after the initial rise, though it is easier to handle when cold. Refrigerate it in a lidded (not airtight) container and use over the next 10 days. Or freeze for up to 4 weeks in 1-pound portions and thaw in the refrigerator overnight before using.

on baking day

  • Pull off a 1-pound (grapefruit size) piece of dough. Place it on a pizza peel prepared with a good amount of cornmeal or rice flour. Quickly shape it into a ball and smooth the surface pressing and smoothing with wet fingers. Cover loosely with plastic wrap and allow to rest for 60 minutes.
  • About 20 minutes into the resting period, preheat a baking stone near the middle of the oven to 450°F, with an empty metal broiler tray on any shelf that won’t interfere with the rising bread.
  • After the bread is rested, make 1/2-inch-deep slashes with a wet serrated bread knife, in a pattern that you like, a cross or crescents. Shimmy loaf onto the hot stone, then quickly pour 1 cup of hot tap water into the boiler tray, and immediately close the oven door. Bake for 45 minutes, or until richly browned and firm. Smaller or larger loaves will require adjustments in resting and baking time.
  • Allow loaf to fully cool on a rack before eating – this is so hard! But it’s essential in getting the best texture.

Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day | Zoe Francois & Jeff Hertzberg
Gluten-Free Artisan Bread | heartbeet kitchen

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31 thoughts on “Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day: Recipe

    1. Amanda Paa Post author

      Hi Kelli! How did the gf Thanksgiving go? You will LOVE this book. I can already see your “midnight baker” baking up a storm with it too. I made a few loaves this weekend for our family Christmas and nobody could tell the difference. Happy holidays to all of you! xo

      Reply
    1. Amanda Paa Post author

      Hi Elizabeth! Seriously makes my day to hear from you. I hope you are doing well! And yes, this bread is so simple and seriously amazing. I almost cried the first time I took a bite. Anybody can do it – I was so scared of the yeast in bread making, but this takes all the fear out of it. xo

      Reply
  1. Carly W

    I’ve been lusting after this book for quite a while …. it sounds great!
    Merry Christmas …. and enjoy breaking bread with those you love.

    Reply
  2. Meg @ The Housewife in Training Files

    I just added that book to my wishlist! I am going through an elimination diet after testing positive to eggs, beef and peas. Then further removing gluten and dairy because I still wasn’t feeling great. I have missed bread as most store bought have eggs or egg whites in them. Your photos are gorgeous and I can’t wait to try out this recipe!

    Reply
    1. Amanda Paa Post author

      Oh, I hope you are feeling better Meg! It’s always difficult to pin down the problem, but sounds like you’re almost there. I am so thankful for this book, I think you’ll love it! I’m making a Christmas Panettone Bread tomorrow with the dough :) xo

      Reply
    1. Amanda Paa Post author

      Thanks for stopping by Courtney! Are you feeling better with no gluten? It can be tricky to figure out what causes our bodies to react, but I hope you find the answer. And yes, this gf bread is sure to cure those cravings! :)

      Reply
  3. Lorna

    This looks like real bread! Thank you, will try it tomorrow. I don’t have a pizza stone though – would a baking tray work, or maybe a glass casserole dish lid?

    Reply
    1. Amanda Paa Post author

      Hi Lorna! It is delicious. If you don’t have a pizza stone, the other option is to use the heaviest gauge baking sheet or jelly-roll pan that you have. Just know that it will not be as crisp as what is shown above. Do not use a glass casserole lid, as it will burst at this high of heat.

      Reply
  4. Lindsey

    i don’t see where to add the sugar in the instructions! I’m assuming you add it with the other solid ingredients, before adding the water but thought i would check to make sure. Thanks!

    Reply
  5. lindsey

    Hi Amanda, I mixed up a half batch of this last night and it’s honestly a gooey mess. I left it in the fridge to see if that would help but it didn’t seem to. I looked up the recipe on the GF AB 5 minutes a day site, and it lists 6.5 cups flour to 3.75 cups liquid. Is the 4.75 cups liquid in your recipe above a typo perhaps?

    Reply
    1. Amanda Paa Post author

      Hi Lindsey! The recipe you see here is for the Whole Grain Gluten-Free Loaf from the book, which is part GF Mix #1 (which is what you found on their website) and part GF Mix #2. These mixes are different flour blends, the GF Mix #2 being all whole-grain, which is in the book. The recipe which I have posted about is for that Whole Grain Loaf, which does actually call for 4.75 cups of liquid because of all the whole grains. So, if you used just the Mix #1 and did not use the other part Mix #2, that would be why it is too much liquid. When both mix 1 & 2 are used as stated above, more liquid is needed so that it is absorbed all of the whole grains.

      Reply
      1. lindsey

        thanks so much for responding so quickly Amanda. I didn’t have any whole grain flour, so that is definitely where I went wrong. Lesson learned! do you think my ‘dough’ is salvageable for anything?

        Reply
        1. Amanda Paa Post author

          Ah, yes, that was the problem then :) Do you have more of flour mix #1 left? If so I would add about 1/2 cup to it, work it in and see what you have. Maybe another 1/2 cup if it is still really sticky, although this dough is made to be sticky before it bakes. I would then press it on with my hand, using saran wrap on top of the dough to make something like a flatbread. You could also try shaping it into rolls. Not sure it will work though…

          Reply
  6. Diana MacDonald

    Can one substitute honey, maple syrup or black-strap molasses for the raw cane sugar and do you think it would be equal to adding the two extra tablespoons of liquid called for it using brown rice flour instead of the white rice flour?

    Reply
    1. amandapaa Post author

      Hi Diana! I’m not sure if that would work, as I haven’t tried it that way. You could ask Zoe, the author of the book. Her website is zoebakes.com — have a great day!

      Reply
  7. Elizabeth

    Hi Amanda,
    I don’t know if you will see this or not as this is an older post but I have a question about the size of the loaves. In the pictures they appear to be a good size but when i made one it turned out to be about the size of a large roll. Which only using a grapefruit sized piece of dough I can understand it wouldn’t be large. My question is, can I make a larger loaf so it can be sliced & used for sandwiches on occasion or is it only meant to be eaten as a side?
    Hope you see this & thanks for any input you can give me.

    Reply
    1. amandapaa Post author

      hi elizabeth! although the pictures make the loaf look big, i would say they are about 5 inches in diameter. i haven’t tried a larger loaf, so you’d have to play around with a longer bake time.

      Reply

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